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dinan

Joined:

Sep 11

Posts: 8

dinan says:

Storing and disposing of maggots/worms

Hi All,

I tend to go for short fishing trips and end up with lots of maggots/worms left over (even when I buy only half a pint of maggots). I have a fridge that is not used for anything else so I can store bait in there. Any thoughts on how long I can keep shop bought maggots plus any other tips on avoiding wasting money buying the live baits each time I go. Plus as I don't live that close to the waters, any thoughts on the best way to dispose of unwanted maggots/worms - is it okay to put them in the compost bin?

I have heard of people shock boiling, freezing maggots. And of course at some point the maggots will become castors but last thing I want is to have a fridge full of flies if I do not dispose of them on time.

 

Thanks in advance for any recommendations -D 

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If1sky

Joined:

Apr 07

Posts: 4391

If1sky says:

Re: Storing and disposing of maggots/worms

If your only buying half a pint for 1-2 hours then you are not feeding enough. Try to aim at feeding a full half pint of bait in about 1-2 hours fishing. As the weather starts getting colder you will use less and less bait to the point where half a pint will last you for a month or longer. To get rid of old bait just bag it tie a knot in it and throw it in the bin or you could leave it on a bird table.

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dinan

Joined:

Sep 11

Posts: 8

dinan says:

Re: Storing and disposing of maggots/worms

@lf1sky  Wow, I thought I was overfeeding as it was with about 3-4 oz of maggots in 1-2 hours. I guess the small silverfish were probably hovering up my morsels of feed so nothing was remaining to attract the bottom feeders? Thanks for the tip.

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david1884

Joined:

Oct 09

Posts: 3146

david1884 says:

Re: Storing and disposing of maggots/worms

Hi Dinan

I used to buy a pint of maggots for a full days session, say 6 hours, and often returned with half of them. Rate of use depends on what water you are fishing and what time of year but it is no use piling in maggots if the fish aren't biting. If you start on maggots and the fish are having none of it so you switch to bread, for instance, you can have a lot left over.

One thing you never know is how old the maggots were when you bought them, so any guide to how long they will keep is useless. If I know I am going fishing again in less than a week I will keep the in my garage fridge - the wife won't have them indoors! If some, or all, have turned to chrysalids thats great because I reckon they are a better roach bait than maggots. If I am not going fishing for a few weeks I put them in a plastic food bag, force the air out and freeze them. I take them out a few hours before fishing and they make a good bait. Sometimes you can get a bite on a dead maggot when you can't get one on a live one, don't ask me why. Dead maggots are also good in a feeder because they won't burrow into the lake bottom like a live one will. Freezing is a better way to kill them as pouring boiling water on them can make them long and skinny and can wash a lot of colour out.

Which ever way you kill them they can go into a garden compost bin but I wouldn't put them into any food recycling bin the council collects! If you haven't got a garden recycling bin you could either bury them or put them in a plastic bag and put it into the rubbish bin.

Nothing makes a fish bigger than almost being caught.

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alanz

Joined:

Sep 11

Posts: 3169

alanz says:

Re: Storing and disposing of maggots/worms

I use Dead Maggots most of the time, Especially for feeder fishing and as david said they make a great addative to Groundbait cos they dont burrow into the bottom silt, If you use them as hook bait remember to keep moving them now and then this will entice a bite

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Hbomb

Joined:

Jul 11

Posts: 187

Hbomb says:

Re: Storing and disposing of maggots/worms

If you are feeding maggots in the hope of attracting bottom feeders in then I agree with If1sky, you need to put more bait in, iif you are fishing for small roach etc then I can understand why small amounts of maggot are being put in. Its all about reading whats happening in your peg.

Even by dumping a potful of dead maggots into your swim at the start will kick start your swim, they are going nowhere unless something picks them up. Then either throw or pot in a pinch of maggot every few minutes and the big fish will move in bullying out the small roach. Or the other way is to feed them out. They will intercept your bait on the drop so if you want to pin your bait to the bottom for bottom feeders, put a bulk shot 6-8inch from the hook that will take your hook bait into the pile of dead maggot at the bottom and try avoid it being intercepted on route. That is unless your carp are taking them as they fall through the water. You must read whats happening and adjjust accordingly.

About this time of year the carp will often switch onto the maggots in a water as long as you feed regularly to maintain bite. Give them a go or ask the fishery owner if they are working for the bigger stuff.

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abborra

Joined:

Nov 08

Posts: 2117

abborra says:

re storing and disposing of maggots/worms

david1884 said:

Hi Dinan

I used to buy a pint of maggots for a full days session, say 6 hours, and often returned with half of them. Rate of use depends on what water you are fishing and what time of year but it is no use piling in maggots if the fish aren't biting. If you start on maggots and the fish are having none of it so you switch to bread, for instance, you can have a lot left over.

One thing you never know is how old the maggots were when you bought them, so any guide to how long they will keep is useless. If I know I am going fishing again in less than a week I will keep the in my garage fridge - the wife won't have them indoors! If some, or all, have turned to chrysalids thats great because I reckon they are a better roach bait than maggots. If I am not going fishing for a few weeks I put them in a plastic food bag, force the air out and freeze them. I take them out a few hours before fishing and they make a good bait. Sometimes you can get a bite on a dead maggot when you can't get one on a live one, don't ask me why. Dead maggots are also good in a feeder because they won't burrow into the lake bottom like a live one will. Freezing is a better way to kill them as pouring boiling water on them can make them long and skinny and can wash a lot of colour out.

Which ever way you kill them they can go into a garden compost bin but I wouldn't put them into any food recycling bin the council collects! If you haven't got a garden recycling bin you could either bury them or put them in a plastic bag and put it into the rubbish bin.


hi david you can tell the age of a maggot by the size of the food sack.....thats thelittle black speck in the body bigger the sack fresher the maggot

abborra

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Wednesday, 22 October 2014